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Grands Crus Classés

Château Pape Clément Grand Cru Classé de Graves

Since its first harvest in 1252, the wines have gained international renown, thanks to the special character of this unique estate.

Château Pape Clément Grand Cru Classé de Graves

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Château La Tour Carnet Grand Cru Classé en 1855, Haut-Médoc

Located in outstanding terroir and dating from the 11th century, this Grand Cru Classé estate is one of the oldest in the region.

Château La Tour Carnet Grand Cru Classé en 1855, Haut-Médoc

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Château Fombrauge Grand Cru Classé de Saint-Émilion

This is the largest Grand Cru Classé estate in Saint-Emilion, while its vineyard holds six centuries of treasured history.

Château Fombrauge Grand Cru Classé de Saint-Émilion

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Clos Haut-Peyraguey Premier Grand Cru Classé de Sauternes en 1855

Sitting atop the highest point of the Bommes commune in Sauternes, this Grand Cru Classé is the fruit of four centuries of unique savoir-faire.

Clos Haut-Peyraguey Premier Grand Cru Classé de Sauternes en 1855

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& Assimilated estates

Château Les Grands Chênes

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Our Châteaux and Hotels

Château Pape Clément

Pessac-Léognan

In its grounds, one thousand-year-old olive trees and an imposing Lebanon cedar tree silently watch over the Château, subtly revealing its period charm.

Château Pape Clément

Pessac-Léognan
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Château La Tour Carnet

Haut-Médoc

Take a trip back through history with a stay at Château La Tour Carnet.

Château La Tour Carnet

Haut-Médoc
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Château Fombrauge

Saint-Emilion

Known to be one of the oldest estates in Saint-Émilion, Château Fombrauge’s vines hold six centuries of treasured history.

Château Fombrauge

Saint-Emilion
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Our Estates

Château Pape Clément Cru Classé de Graves

Get to know this Classified Growth dating back seven centuries.

Château Pape Clément Cru Classé de Graves

About The Château

Château La Tour Carnet Grand Cru Classé en 1855, Haut-Médoc

Venez vivre l'histoire d'un des domaines viticoles les plus vieux du Bordelais.

Château La Tour Carnet Grand Cru Classé en 1855, Haut-Médoc

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Château Fombrauge Grand Cru Classé de Saint-Émilion

Soak up the magic of this outstanding Grand Cru, whose history goes back to the 16th century.

Château Fombrauge Grand Cru Classé de Saint-Émilion

About The Château

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Acanthe Hôtel

Bordeaux

Located in the historic part of Bordeaux’s city centre, the Acanthe Hôtel offers guests a warm and friendly welcome all year round.

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Journey deep into the Bordeaux vineyard, taking tours of our wine estates and tasting their wines.

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Why a wine bottle measures 75cl

I’m sure you’ve noticed that a wine bottle measures 75cl rather than a litre. Whereas the basic unit of volume for liquid products is 1 litre (water, milk and so on), the wine bottle is the exception with its traditional 75cl format. This measure, standardised in the 19th century, has given rise to numerous theories to attempt to explain why 75cl was chosen. I wonder if you know the real reason.

Some weird and wonderful hypotheses...

Since the standard 75cl format was established, multiple explanations, some of them weird and wonderful, have been put forward. Here are some of the weirdest ones:

• 75cl corresponded to the average lung capacity of a glass blower (in other words, the volume of air that he could exhale before losing his breath).
• 75cl corresponded to the average consumption of a person during a meal, i.e. 6 glasses on average.
• 75cl bottles were the ideal size for storing, unlike 1-litre plastic bottles that were generally for cheap-end wines. (It is recognised however that wine stored in larger formats keeps better).
• 75cl bottles are easy to transport

Of course, however well-researched and original these theories may be, none of them has any base to them.

The answer lies in history

In fact, the real reason for this 75cl bottle format is an historical one and a quite surprising one, too. While wine is unquestionably our beloved France’s pride and joy, ironically we owe its unusual bottle capacity to our British neighbours.

This measure was actually chosen in the 19th century by Bordeaux growers and Bordeaux’s British wine merchant houses, at a time when the United Kingdom was the leading importer of French wines.
In those days, while we in France already used the litre unit to measure quantities of liquid, the British used a quite different unit of measure: the gallon, also known as the imperial gallon (1 gallon = 4.54609 litres).
When Bordeaux wines were shipped abroad, they travelled in 50-gallon (225-litre) “tonneaux” or “barriques”.
The conversion of this quantity into bottles proved a headache for wine merchants.

To facilitate these conversions during the purchasing process, a capacity had to be established which could produce a round number of bottles.

Bordeaux’s British wine merchant houses therefore found a unit of measure which allowed them to divide a 225-litre barrel into 300 bottles, which was 75cl.

Since those days, this measure has become the European norm.

If you would also like to know why wine is generally sold in cases of 6 or 12, it is simply because 1 gallon equals 6 bottles and 2 gallons equal 12 bottles.

Our traditional 75cl bottle therefore came about for practical reasons and offered a way of avoiding a great many headaches.

And as for the hollow punt at the bottom of the bottle, far from being some fancy design, it ensures the bottle’s stability. Known as the “piqûre” in the wine world, it gives reinforcement to the bottle when it is stood upright.

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